‘A Licence To Break The Law’

Canadians are puzzled by police refusal to arrest aboriginal road, rail and pipeline blockaders, or government office occupiers. However, this two-tiered, racially-biased policing can be traced back at least 40 years. Here’s an analysis of some 1970s’ lawlessness produced by an Aboriginal Industry activist and anti-Canadian who is, of course, employed by a taxpayer-supported Canadian university: 

“When approximately thirty members of the ‘Idle No More’ and ‘Black Lives Matter’ movements entered the ‘Indigenous’ and Northern Affairs (‘I’NAC) office in Toronto on April 13, 2016…the group, calling itself ‘#OccupyINAC’ was drawing on long-established political strategies.

“‘Indigenous’ peoples have occupied Indian Affairs offices before.  Continue reading ‘A Licence To Break The Law’

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‘Dysfunctional Governance: Yukon’s Liard ‘First Nation’

“The Liard ‘First Nation’, {a ‘nation’ of 1,152 people} based in Watson Lake, Yukon, is asking the Federal Court to restore its control of the funding it receives from the federal government. 

“The ‘First Nation’ has been under third-party management for two years. The condition was imposed after it fell more than $700,000 in debt and failed to abide by the ‘Federal ‘First Nations’ Transparency Act’. 

“The third-party manager is an aboriginal-owned B.C. company called ‘Ganhada’. The firm said it does not comment on cases, but its relations with the Liard ‘First Nation’ have been rocky. When it was first appointed, it took seven months for Ganhada’s workers to gain access to ‘First Nation’ offices in Watson Lake.  Continue reading ‘Dysfunctional Governance: Yukon’s Liard ‘First Nation’

‘Stop The Fraud!’

 “…we refuse to accept that Canada can demand accountability from us…”

‘Monitoring of billions pledged to aboriginals is lacking’ 

“Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has gone to great lengths to foster a warm relationship with aboriginals. He has promised to fulfil every recommendation of the ‘Truth and Reconciliation Commission’, including an inquiry into murdered and missing aboriginal women which is expected to cost $40 million alone.

“More recently, aboriginals were among the big winners in the government’s first budget. They’ve been promised an extra $8.4 billion over five years for infrastructure, education and training.

“That’s all well and good, but extra injections of taxpayers’ money should be accompanied by oversight, so Canadians can be certain the funds are being properly spent.  Continue reading ‘Stop The Fraud!’