‘Enough Of Us Hating Ourselves’

“Europeans and those from other continents who immigrated legally to Canada and their descendants, have a right to live here equal to that of any ‘indigenous’ person.” 

“It is surely time for a serious, non-partisan, open-minded public policy discussion of the subject of ‘indigenous people’ {‘descendants of Siberian settlers’}. I believe there is a very strong consensus that everyone wishes them well; most people acknowledge that the native people have some legitimate grievances and want to address them, and almost everyone acknowledges that official policy in this area has been unsuccessful. And a great many people are tired of the issue and impatient for a change in the ambiance of ever-greater expense and more militantly-expressed native grievances.  Continue reading ‘Enough Of Us Hating Ourselves’

‘What Happened To The ‘Neutrals’?’

This is the tribe that occupied southwestern Ontario until the 1650s, when fellow Iroquois tribes from what is now the U.S. rendered them extinct. In modern terminology, they were ‘victims of genocide’ {although they were far from passive}: 

“It is 1625… and I have just stepped into the few recorded pages of the Iroquoian ‘Neutrals’. What I saw, riveted my attention.

“I was not prepared for the total nakedness of these people. Their skin was saturated by blood scarring, with charcoal-pierced tattoos of snakes, monstrous beasts and “Oki” spirits. They were the tallest, finest-bodied people among the Huron, Petun and Five Iroquois Nations. There were no hunchbacks, club feet or one-eyes in the villages. Unlike the other Iroquoians, there was no specific style of hair… no head-dress… but curls were not allowed. Continue reading ‘What Happened To The ‘Neutrals’?’

‘The Lachine Massacre’

The Canadian people, and most certainly Canadian children, are almost continually subjected to Aboriginal Industry propaganda, a pillar of which is the historical narrative whereby murderous, thieving Europeans impose ‘genocide’ and violence on the innocent, saintly and otherwise virtuous aboriginal inhabitants. While not wishing to belabour the point, we still feel compelled to occasionally present some historical balance: 

“In the evening of August 4, 1689, the night of the Lachine massacre, a violent rainstorm hovered above the Saint Lawrence and the Island of Montréal. Lightning flashed repeatedly across the sky and deafening thunder resounded above the seventy-seven houses of the community of Lachine.

“As the Canadiens slept in their isolated farms, fifteen hundred Iroquois stepped ashore, undetected by the sentries who had sought shelter against the fierce storm. Hidden by the night, warriors fanned out in small bands and readied themselves to attack isolated farmhouses.

“They lurked on the edges of the woods, away from the dogs who might have given warning. These men dressed only in loincloths, their faces painted in grotesque shapes meant to frighten their victims, waited for the light of dawn to pillage the community.  Continue reading ‘The Lachine Massacre’